A new type of wagashi

- taking traditional ingredients a step further

Gokokuya is a new type of wagashi* made from ancient grains and traditional, fermented seasonings such as soy sauce, mirin* and koji* that are unique to Japanese cuisine. We set out to explore traditional ingredients and ended up creating new and surprising Japanese sweets.

*wagashi: Japanese sweets, *mirin: a kind of sweet sake *koji: malted rice

Grains and FermentationGokokuya

Rediscovering traditional grains

Staples such as rise, bread and noodles all made from grains. Long ago, the Japanese diet relied on a more diverse range of grains, including millet, sorghum, buckwheat, sesame and a variety of beans. Collectively, there are known as gokoku and are rich in fibres and minerals. They are now making a comeback as the country rediscovers its own food traditions.

Grains and Fermentation image
Grains and Fermentation image

The power of fermentation

Fermentation has played a vital role in traditional Japanese food and drink. Soy sause, miso, sake, mirin, and vinegar start off as soybean and rice but are transformed by fermentation. The process turns sugars and proteins into pure goodness -resulting in flavors rich in umami, the now widely accepted fifth taste.

Handmade by artisans

Wagashi are artfully crafted. They reflect the changing seasons, the terroir and the culture of the region. As a patissier creates pastries and cakes, the shokunin(artisan) creates wagashi. The hand of shokunin are his most important tool. Ingredients are formed, cut, folded, and wrapped. Wagashi is made swiftly and precisely. There’s a natural rhythm to the process. The skills are learned over time, from repetition and the pursuit of perfection.

Handmade by artisans image
artisan image

News

News image
2016.10.27

GOKOKUYA's products were settled in Malaysia.

On October 27, Isetan The Japan Store Lot 10 located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia had grand opening. GOKOKUYA products will be introduced to people in Malaysia there. Please stop by at ISETAN's GOKOKUYA on LG floor.

Gokokuya’s Sweets

Itsuki Yokan image Itsuki Yokan package image Itsuki Yokan package image
  • A : Sake
  • B : Matcha and salted koji
  • C : Apple vinegar
  • D : White miso
  • E : Soy sauce koji

Itsuki Yokan- sweet jellies

Gokojuya’s small, round yokan are a refreshing, new take on the traditional red-bean jelly. Available in five unique flavors, all based on traditional fermented ingredient: sake, matcha and salted koji, apple vinegar, soy sauce koji, white miso.

  • Itsuki Yokan package image
  • Itsuki Yokan package image

五季 発酵さしすせそ羊羹

よつ割り 発酵最中

Yotsuwari Monaka- wafer sandwich

Crisp wafers made from various types of grain and rice flour, with sweet fillings added just before eating. The wafers can be divided in four and shared with friends. Available in four flavors.

  • package image
Yotsuwari Monaka image Yotsuwari Monaka image Yotsuwari Monaka package image
  • A : Salted koji and kinako
  • B : Yuzu and rice vinegar
  • C : Sweet soy
  • D : Sesame miso
Yama Musubi image Yama Musubi package image Yama Musubi package image

Yama Musubi- mountain sembei

Light and crispy sembei rice crackers in two different flavors: one uses brown rice and a sweet soy sauce, the other a blend of seven grains (including millet, barley and black rice) and flavored with katsuobushi* powder. An umami-packed treat.

*katsuobushi: dried and cured bonito

  • package image
  • package image

山むすび 五穀せんべい

千千豆 五穀豆菓子

Chiji Mame- flavored peanuts

Gently roasted peanuts coated with a crunchy shell made of rice and Japanese barnyard millet flour. Perfect as a snack served with hot green tea. Available in six flavors: sake lees and red azuki beans, salted koji and kinako*, ume plum vinegar, white soy sauce, aonori seaweed and miso, wasabi and soy sauce.

*kinako: roasted soy bean flour

  • package image
  • package image
Chiji Mame image Chiji Mame package image Chiji Mame package image
  • A : Ume plum vinegar
  • B : Salted koji and kinako
  • C : White soy sauce
  • D : Aonori seaweed and miso
  • E : Sake lees and red azuki beans
  • F : Wasabi and soy sauce
Itsukusa image
  • A : Sorghum and salted koji
  • B : Fragrant soy sauce
  • C : Black rice and sake
  • D : Common millet and mandarin vinegar
  • E : Foxtail millet and miso

Itsukusa- petite manju

Small manju cakes filled with flavored bean paste. The dough is made using a variety of grains, such as millet and black rice, and the fragrant fillings contain traditional fermented ingredients such as miso and soy sauce. Available in five flavors.

いつくさ 五穀まんじゅう

はるごと 五穀おはぎ

Harugoto- petite ohagi

Ohagi are small balls of rice wrapped around sweat bean paste or bean paste wrapped around a core of rice, barley and flavored fillings. Available in three flavors.

Harugoto image
  • A : Brown rice
  • B : Red rice
  • C : Hulled barley
Awase image
  • A : Sweetened koji
  • B : Caramelized soy sauce

Awase- dorayaki pancakes

Awase are small pancakes wrapped around sweet bean paste and flavored with caramelized soy sauce or sweet koji. The fragrant, chewy pancakes match the sweet and light filling. Handmade by our experienced artisans.

あわせ 五穀どらやき

きづつみ 進物

Kidutsumi- assortment

Assortment of wagashi and tea. Send the gift box to someone important to you.

  • Kidutsumi01 image
    K001Kidutsumi (K001)
  • Kidutsumi02 image
    K002Kidutsumi (K002)
  • Kidutsumi03 image
    K003Kidutsumi (K003)
  • Kidutsumi05 image
    K004Kidutsumi (K004)
  • Kidutsumi06 image
    K005Kidutsumi (K005)
  • Kidutsumi07 image
    K006Kidutsumi (K006)
Kidutsumi image Kidutsumi01 image Kidutsumi02 image Kidutsumi03 image Kidutsumi04 image Kidutsumi05 image Kidutsumi06 image
  • Kidutsumi (K001)
    <Yama Musubi> Brown rice and soy sauce (5) Salted seven grains (5)
    <Yotsuwari> Sweet soy (2) Salted koji and kinako (1) Sesame miso (1) Yuzu and rice vinegar (1)
  • Kidutsumi (K002)
    <Yama Musubi> Brown rice and soy sauce (7) Salted seven grains (7)
    <Yotsuwari> Sweet soy (2) Salted koji and kinako (1) Sesame miso (1) Yuzu and rice vinegar (1)
  • Kidutsumi (K003)
    <Yama Musubi> Brown rice and soy sauce (2) Salted seven grains (2)
    <Yotsuwari> Sweet soy (1) Salted koji and kinako (1)
    <Chijimame> White soy sauce (1)
    <Gokoku Hakkou-cha> 100g
  • Kidutsumi (K004)
    <Yama Musubi> Brown rice and soy sauce (2) Salted seven grains (2)
    <Yotsuwari> Sweet soy (1) Salted koji and kinako (1) Sesame miso (1) Yuzu and rice vinegar (1)
    <Chijimame> Sake lees and red azuki beans (1) Salted koji and kinako (1) Ume plum vinegar (1) Wasabi and soy sauce (1)
    <Gokoku Hakkou-cha> 100g
  • Kidutsumi (K005)
    <Yama Musubi> Brown rice and soy sauce (6) Salted seven grains (6)
    <Yotsuwari> Sweet soy (2) Salted koji and kinako (1) Sesame miso (1) Yuzu and rice vinegar (1)
    <Chijimame> Sake lees and red azuki beans (1) Salted koji and kinako (1) Ume plum vinegar (1) White soy sauce (1) Aonori seaweed and miso (1)
    <Itsuki> Sake (1) Matcha and salted koji (1) Apple vinegar (1) White miso (1) Soy sause koji (1)
  • Kidutsumi (K006)
    <Yama Musubi> Brown rice and soy sauce (2) Salted seven grains (2)
    <Yotsuwari> Sweet soy (2) Salted koji and kinako (1) Sesame miso (1) Yuzu and rice vinegar (1)
    <Chijimame> Sake lees and red azuki beans (1) Salted koji and kinako (1) Sme plum vinegar (1) Shite soy sauce (1) Aonori seaweed and miso (1) Wasabi and soy sauce (1)
    <Itsuki> Sake (1) Matcha and salted koji (1) Apple vinegar (1) White miso (1) Soy sause koji (1)
    <Gokoku Hakkou-cha> 100g

Gokoku Hakkou-cha
-Five Grains fermemted tea

Gokokuya's own special tea. The deepeness of koji fermentation along with the gragrance of the Five Grains.

Gokoku Hakkou-cha imageGokoku Hakkou-cha image

五穀発酵茶

Mt.Fuji image
anecdote Itsuki image
Episode 1

[Itsuki]Itsuki Yokan icon

the fifthseason

Spring, Summer, Autumn and Winter. One season follows the next.
However, the seasons do not change from one day to the next.
Slowly Spring turns to Summer. Autumn to Winter.
The days between the seasons are known as doyo in Japanese and as the fifth season mark the change from one to the next.

anecdote Yotsuwari image
Episode 2

[Yotsuwari]Yotsuwari icon

the benefits of sharing

Osusowake. Ofukuwake.Both words for expressing the Japanese custom of sharing.
Like the sharing of the kagamimochi (mirror rice-cake) at New Year.
By sharing what is available, everyone gets closer and the group gets stronger.
From old times, this is has always been part of the Japanese way of thinking.

anecdote Yamamusubi image
Episode 3

[Yama Musubi]Yamamusubi icon

Mountain-shape rice balls

Have you ever wondered why the humble Japanese rice-ball is triangular and not round?
From old time, travellers have shaped their onigiri, or musubi as they are also called, like a mountain
in reverence of the mountain spirits, praying for a safe jouney.

anecdote Chijimame image
Episode 4

[Chiji Mame]Chijimame icon

beans to ward of evil

The Japanese love to play with words. Many words are pronounced the same, but differ in meaning.
For instance mame, that both usually signifies “bean” but is also used in the common expression mamenihataraku – work like a horse, or literally; work like a bean. By eating roasted beans we believe you are able to ward of evil.

anecdote Itsukusa image
Episode 5

[Itsukusa]Itsukusa icon

ancient Japanese meaning “five kinds of grains”

The meaning of five

Gokoku – five grains. Ancient eastern philosophy talks about the five elements of wood, earth, water, fire and metal.
Everything is made of five parts. Five makes the world go around, creates connections and a sustainable cycle of all things. This is the power of five according to traditional Japanese philosophy.

anecdote Harugoto image
Episode 6

[Harugoto]Harugoto icon

an old custom for celebrating the coming of spring and sharing mochi rice-cakes

The culture of longing

One of the charms of Japanese culture is the custom of longing. Longing for the cherry blossoms to bloom. The sun or moon to rise.
Or even longing for the darkness of night. The journey is cherished perhaps even more than the destination itself.
We believe the secret to happiness lies precisely in this longing.

anecdote Awase image
Episode 6

[Awase]Awase icon

enjoying both sides

Japanese cherish both the visible and the invisible. Front and back. As much care is given to choosing the appropriate lining of a Kimono as the visible fabric.
In the ancient game of kai-awase (shell-matching) popular during the Heian period, both the beautiful lacquer paintings inside the shell but also the unadorned shell itself was admired.
Valuing both the visible and the invisible is an intrinsic part of Japanese culture.

anecdote kidutsumi image
Episode 8

[Kidutsumi]kidutsumi icon

bthe spirit of giving

Gifts for someone special. It’s more than just the gift itself that is given.
Gratitude, joy and thankfulness are also wrapped up in the act of giving.
Even the precise folds i the wrapping paper. The knot of the ribbon.
They are all part of the many ways to express your gratitude in Japan.

ユーザーズガイド

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